203 articles tagged "Vegetable Crops - General".

Since there is an article about the application of insecticides in this issue, below I list 10 rules that will help vegetable growers apply fungicides effectively and safely. Apply fungicides prior to the development of disease. Although many fungicides have systemic (“kick back”) action they will not completely eradicate diseases after they have started. And by the time a single disease lesion is observed in the field, many more lesions too small to observe are already working at your crop. Most systemic fungicides move less than an inch toward the tip of the plant or may just move from the upper to the lower side of the leaf. Use shorter spray intervals during weather conducive to plant disease. Each plant disease has its own “personality” and thus prefers different weather. However, most plant diseases require leaf wetness. Therefore, during periods of rain and heavy dews, more frequent fungicide applications are[Read More…]


It’s not uncommon for us to get calls from growers who are expressing concern about a particular insecticide product that is not working as well as the growers would like. Often, growers will suggest that Product X is no good or that the target insect has now developed resistance to that particular insecticide. Before we jump to conclusions, we need to consider a number of possible causes for poor performance by an insecticide. Here are some questions to consider if you are not getting the control you would like. Are you using the right product? Every fall, a group of vegetable entomologists from throughout the Midwest thoroughly revise the insecticide recommendations in the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide (ID56). The products we list in the guide are the ones that we believe work for a particular pest, based either on research trials or through our experience with growers. That’s why we[Read More…]


Figure 1. Top left: old plastic viewed from inside High Tunnel 1. Top right: old plastic as it is being removed. Bottom left: old plastic on left and new plastic on right over a piece of lined paper. Bottom right: High Tunnel 1 with new plastic covering.

Have you ever wondered how much difference new plastic would make in terms of light getting to crops in a high tunnel? We replaced 6-year-old plastic on High Tunnel 1 at Pinney Purdue Ag Center last week. Figure 1 below shows the high tunnel before and after recovering, and pieces of the old and new plastic. We had a sensor measuring PAR (photosynthetically active radiation, light available for plant use in photosynthesis) in the structure, and a similar sensor in High Tunnel 2, which had new plastic in Dec., 2017. The Ag Center also has an automated weather station that measures solar radiation. Here is what these sensors showed us (Figure 1). Figure 2 shows the PAR readings throughout the day in the two high tunnels and solar radiation outside. High Tunnel 1 had the 6-year-old plastic. The plastic was removed on July 9. On July 7 and 8, before[Read More…]


Does your farm often have excess produce in your growing period? We would love to connect our volunteers to come and glean that produce and put it on a plate of someone who needs this fresh food! Gleaning America’s Fields – Feeding America’s Hungry. We do it simply, effectively, and efficiently. Since 1983, Society of St. Andrew has saved fresh, nutritious produce from America’s farms – produce that otherwise go to waste – and delivered it to hunger-relief agencies. In January 2018, Society of St. Andrew (SoSA) opened a new office in Indiana. The office is based in Indianapolis but the work is throughout the state. SoSA has gleaned here in the past, but will now make a significantly larger impact across the Hoosier State. In the first year, we expect to glean about one million pounds of produce from Indiana farm fields. All of this gleaned food will be[Read More…]


Figure 1. Blossom end rot of tomato.

We recently received several calls reporting blossom end rot of tomatoes (Figure 1). Although blossom end rot is caused by deficient supply of calcium to the developing fruit. The occurrence of this physiological disorder often relates to inconsistent supply of water. As a general rule, vegetables require 1-1.5 acre-inches of water per week. Since there is no rain in high tunnels, all the required water should be applied through irrigation. How does one determine if enough water has been applied to vegetables? This article provides some ideas. The first information needed is the irrigated area. For example, tomatoes are growing in a 30 × 96 high tunnel with 6 beds that are about 4 feet wide. Then the irrigated area is about 2,304 square feet (6 × 4 × 96 = 2,304). An acre has 43,560 square feet. So the irrigated area is roughly 2,304 / 43,560 = 0.05 acre.[Read More…]




Would you like to learn more about biological control and how to use it successfully? New York State Integrated Pest Management biocontrol specialist Amara Dunn has a new blog – “Biocontrol Bytes” (https://blogs.cornell.edu/biocontrolbytes/). Short articles are posted approximately once a month to share information, answer stakeholder questions, and connect readers to other relevant resources. Subscribe using the green button on the right side of the page in order to receive email updates when new articles are posted.


Three videos on in-row weeding tools (Finger weeder, Torsion weeder, Tine harrow) were developed at the Michigan State University Department of Horticulture. Each video is 20 minutes: introduces the tool, how it works, different models, show adjusting the tool in the field, and a short interview with a farmer who uses the tool. These videos can be accessed at the MSU Mechanical Weed Control Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH-k889oYbUaEznvgiDtrOQ


Produce display with FoodLink

Would you buy something if you didn’t understand how it worked or what to do with it? Likely not… Imagine a customer of yours who doesn’t know how to select, prepare or store the fresh healthful produce that you are growing and offering for sale. How likely is it that they will buy that product? Or buy it twice? What are we doing at the point of sale to encourage that purchase? Your produce may be cosmetically perfect and 100% healthful but is it able to communicate to the customer anything about its selection, use or how much their family will enjoy it if prepared properly? Most every packaged, ready to eat, value added product in the grocery store is designed to convey these messages in a loud and clear format…Have you seen the breakfast cereal aisle in the grocery store lately? Those products are conveying an undeniable “BUY ME” message and they are directly competing for customer dollars with your silent but beautiful (and healthful) produce every day. There[Read More…]


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