180 articles tagged "Vegetable Crops - General".

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No reason exists to expect drought anytime soon in Indiana, with much of the state remaining rather wet after last weekend’s showers. One good new development exists. The precipitation pattern that has existed since nearly January seems to be becoming a little less predictable, which could mean more periods of drier weather between fronts on the horizon. Another bit of good news exists in above normal temperatures predicted on both the 7-10 and 8-14 day forecasts, according to the Climate Prediction Center (https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/), which would allow for quicker drying of soils after any precipitation that does fall. Current growing degree days (base 50) for 2019, as of April 22, vary from 206 in Indianapolis to 322 in Evansville to 111 in Angola, marking a clear gradient in insect development and greening from south to north.  The entire state is now monitoring conditions for issuance of frost/freeze warnings from the NWS,[Read More…]


From time to time, I will make changes to the MW Vegetable Production Guide.   These changes will appear automatically in the on-line version.  For those who purchase a hard copy, watch the Vegetable Crops Hotline for changes. See below for the changes that have been made to the Production guide for 2019   Page Comment 1 Add “Anthony Hanson, IPM program” under contributors, University of Minnesota 117 Under powdery mildew, last sentence in disease notes-“Protect pumpkin vines until approximately 21 days from last harvest.” 128 FRAC code for Actigard should be P01 147 Buckeye rot products, Orondis Opti 3-day PHI. 148 Under late blight, Orondis Opti 3-day PHI. 164 Footnote 2 should read “X=permitted for at least one crop.” Footnote 3 should read “X=may be used for that crop.  *=processing crops only.” 226 Define herbicide should be omitted.  


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I know as producers of some of the finest fruits, veggies, herbs and flowers in Indiana no one is more excited to welcome Spring and a new market year than YOU! Whether or not you have used FoodLink in the past as a way to increase consumer knowledge of and interest in your products we wanted to make sure that you have full access to FoodLink resources. We want to give you the resources to reach more customers and bring them to your food and continue to return.  You can order more resources from the Ed Store to help you in your marketing efforts or print items off using our PDF resources. FoodLink resources ae FREE to use and are waiting only for your innovative application in your displays, marketing materials, promotional ads (traditional media OR better…SOCIAL MEDIA) and packaging materials. Be on the lookout for upcoming social media posts that are rolling out starting[Read More…]


On April 1, 2019, Dr. Hazel Wetzstein, Head of the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, announced a change in leadership for the Indiana Horticulture Congress. “I am pleased to announce that Petrus Langenhoven and Kyle Daniel have agreed to serve as Co-Chairs for the Indiana Horticulture Congress, effective immediately. They bring a wealth of information and experience and I am looking forward to the leadership they will bring to IHC”. Peter Hirst, will be stepping down as chair. He is going to maintain a program in Pomology in the HLA Department and will assume an active international role as Assistant Director in International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA). “We all wish to thank Peter for his dedication and many years of service as IHC Chair. It is important to note that the past successes of Hort Congress would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of Lori Jolly-Brown and[Read More…]


The rain seems to keep falling, barely providing time for things to dry out and start planting!  The last few weeks has experienced up to 2” above normal precipitation – particularly for west-central and southern Indiana, which is near the 125th-125th percentile. Warm days seem to be relatively few and far between, causing a slow start to growing degree-day (GDD) accumulations. While it is still early in the season, Indiana has only accumulated about 30-60 GDD units, with the few amounts to the north. Hard freezes (<= 28°F are still in recent memory, with the most recent hard freeze occurring just last week (April 1-3).  For April 8-16, precipitation forecasts are predicting 1.5”-2.5” of rain, with the higher amounts expected in the southern half of the state. There is still a 25-50% chance of a 32°F freeze occurring in southern counties and over a 90% chance of a freeze occurring[Read More…]


Basic Aspects of High Tunnel Soil Fertility Management – (Petrus Langenhoven, plangenh@purdue.edu, 765-496-7955) – Spring has arrived! Every high tunnel grower is now thinking of planting summer vegetable crops in high tunnels or has already planted. Whichever scenario applies to you, I hope that you have submitted soil samples or are in the process of submitting samples to your closest laboratory. Have you analyzed your irrigation water? It will be a good idea to send a water sample along too. There is a lot of important information locked up in your water and soil test results. The results will help you to plan and manage your high tunnel fertility program. Remember, growing in a high tunnel is like growing crops in an irrigated desert. Natural rainfall is unavailable inside your high tunnel and therefore all your plants water needs are satisfied through an irrigation system. Fertilizer needs could be addressed[Read More…]


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Dual Magnum® has had a special local needs (24C) label in Indiana for use on transplanted bell peppers and other vegetables for a number of years. Last week the label was amended to include additional small fruit and vegetable crops, including asparagus. The new 24C label is available on the National Pesticide Information Retrieval System web site: http://npirspublic.ceris.purdue.edu/state/state_menu.aspx?state=IN. To find it, type “SLN IN” and “130003” in the first two boxes for “EPA Registration Number” and click the search button. The product report will show  “DUAL MAGNUM – TRANSPLANTED BELL PEPPERS.” Click on the ALLSTAR symbol. On the page that opens, click on the Company Label ID number “IN0816048DA0319.” This will open a pdf of the label. If you decide to use the product, carefully read and follow the label instructions.


Inspections of produce farms for compliance with the Food Safety Modernization Act Produce Safety Rule (PSR) are set to begin in July 2019. Passage of SB 331 in the Indiana General Assembly in 2018 gave the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) PSR enforcement authority in Indiana, making them the lead agency for inspections. SB 331 established no additional requirements beyond those of the federal rule. The rollout of the inspection program will be staggered, to reflect the staggered compliance dates found in the PSR. During 2019, ISDH will be conducting inspections only on farms that have produce sales exceeding $25,000 and total food sales exceeding $500,000. As inspections are rolled out, here are some things to remember: Prior to an inspection, growers will be contacted by ISDH by mail and by telephone. There will be no unannounced inspections. The inspectors will be as flexible as possible when setting up[Read More…]


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March has been welcoming Indiana like a lion with below-normal temperatures and a combination of above and below normal precipitation (see figure). Snowfall accumulated across the state ranging from less than 1” in the southwest and northwest to as much as 3-4” in the southeast part of Indiana. This precipitation has caused drought to be absent across the state, but monthly and seasonal climate outlooks from the Climate Prediction Center (https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/) suggest an increasing chance of below normal precipitation over the next few months.  While temperatures will continue to gradually warm throughout spring, there are still significant risks for a late season freeze. The typical date of the last hard (28°F or less) freeze is late March in southern Indiana to late April in northeast Indiana. However, hard freezes have occurred as late as mid-April in the southeast counties into mid-May for northern Indiana. According to the Weather Prediction Center[Read More…]


Cover crops can be a useful conservation practice for improving soil health, scavenging and recycling nutrients, reducing erosion, and contributing to more resilient cropping systems over the long term.  Two new extension publications about Cover Crop Recipes for Indiana are available at the Purdue Education Store: https://edustore.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=AY-356-W https://edustore.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=AY-357-W There is also a webinar scheduled on Feb. 22 at 10 am EST for a discussion of the new Indiana cover crop recipe. More information about this event and the publications are available at the Midwest Cover Crops Council website http://mccc.msu.edu/getting-started/cover-crop-recipes/


Vegetable Crops Hotline - Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture 625 Agriculture Mall Dr. West Lafayette, IN 47907

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