Elizabeth Long

Assistant Professor
Entomology

2 articles by this author

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You may be seeing a few “stink bug-like” insects crawling around on your cucurbit crops this time of year. However, these slightly more slender insects are not stink bugs, they are actually squash bugs. Similarly to stink bugs though, they do give off quite an odor when crushed! Squash bug adults and nymphs (immatures) (Figures 1 – 3) attack all cucurbit vine crops, especially squash, pumpkin, cucumber, and melon. These insects feed by sticking their needle-like mouthparts into plant parts to sip on sap. Feeding damage by adults and nymphs can cause significant damage to the fruit and foliage: damaged fruits are disfigured and discolored, and leaves may wilt and become brittle and discolored as well. Generally, squash bugs are not a problem if controlled earlier in the season with insecticides. If not however, it’s still possible to see adults, nymphs, and even egg masses on plants as we move[Read More…]


Recently we have received reports of swarms of hover flies (aka syrphid flies) around Indiana and wanted to take the opportunity to tell you a bit about this curious insect (Figure 1). Adult hover flies can sometimes be mistaken for bees or wasps, because they look a lot like them! Some people refer to hover flies as “sweat flies” or “sweat bees,” but these insects are actually quite different from bees. Hover flies belong to the Order Diptera, or the true flies. The most abundant group at this time of year belong to the genus Toxomerus, which feed on pollen (Figure 2) rather than other soft-bodied insects, like aphids. Hover flies are typically lighter in color, have a characteristic abdomen-bobbing behavior, and cannot sting at all – in fact, they are harmless. Sweat bees, on the other hand, are typically dark or metallic in color, smaller than common bees and[Read More…]