Articles from 2016

130 articles found.

Downy mildew has now been observed on butternut squash, jack-o-lantern pumpkins and cucumbers in Knox County. The list of cucurbits observed in Porter County has been updated to include butternut squash and giant pumpkin. All cucurbit growers should assume that downy mildew is present nearby and may attack any cucurbit crop. However, it is not clear what affect downy mildew may have on cucurbit crops this late in the season. Pumpkin growers who expect to harvest in the next few weeks may not need to take any management steps at this time. Downy mildew affects only leaves; stems and fruit are unaffected. Indirect effects of downy mildew in fruit are unlikely to be observed in a few weeks. Another article in this Hotline issue discusses the question of when to stop managing diseases in pumpkins. If the decision is made to apply fungicides, this article https://vegcropshotline.org/article/cucurbit-downy-mildew-watch/ or the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide mwveguide.org will help to select a[Read More…]


Several pumpkin growers have asked me when to stop managing for pumpkin diseases. That is, when should a pumpkin grower stop applying fungicides? I cannot provide a definitive answer for this question; every grower will have to make his or her own decision. Below, however, are some factors to consider. Estimate the crop yield – walk through the field and evaluate the yield of pumpkins that are ready to harvest. Be sure to only consider fruit of marketable quality. If the yield is at or above what is expected, it may be time to put the sprayer away. Estimate when harvest will take place – Pumpkins that are scheduled for harvest in the next week or two are less likely to need any fungicide treatment. A longer period to final harvest may indicate that there is time for immature fruit to ripen. For example, pumpkins that are to be picked by the consumer up to Halloween may[Read More…]


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Southwest Indiana Melon and Vegetable Growers’ Technical Meeting  Date: November 28, 2016 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EST) Location: Southwest Purdue Ag Center (SWPAC), 4369 N. Purdue Road, Vincennes, IN The meeting will start at 5 P.M. for board members to discuss topics for the March meeting. Any member who wants to participate in the discussion is welcome. At 6 P.M., dinner will be served. Following that, we will showcase variety trials conducted at SWPAC in 2016, which include seedless watermelons, cantaloupes, personal-sized watermelons, and seeded watermelons. Any grower interested in becoming a member is invited to attend. Membership dues are $15 per year and can be paid at the meeting. To register please call (812) 886-0198. Registration is due by Nov. 22. Any questions, please contact Wenjing Guan at guan40@purdue.edu    Illiana Vegetable Growers Symposium Date: January 5, 2017 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. CST Location: Teibel’s Family Restaurant, 1775 US 41, US 30 & US 41, Schererville,[Read More…]


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Amanda Deering is the Indiana Leader for the North Central Region Center for Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Training, Extension and Technical Assistance. As the state leader, she is responsible for identifying and notifying partner organizations, businesses, and agencies in Indiana that can assist with communicating and disseminating information about FSMA to fruit and vegetable producers. In addition, the Center is asking growers to complete a brief, anonymous survey to introduce fruit and vegetable growers to the Center and to help them determine if they will need to comply with the FSMA Produce Rule. This will also help determine the top educational needs in Indiana.  The survey can be found at http://qeasttrial.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8FWKOX9AYADrWqF. We recognize that your time is extremely valuable so as a token of appreciation, the Center will hold a drawing and award three participants a $50 gift card. Note entry in the drawing will require that you provide your name[Read More…]


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The Midwest Cover Crops Council (MCCC) strives to facilitate widespread adoption of cover crops throughout the Midwest, to improve ecological, economic, and social sustainability. The Cover Crop Decision Tool is an initiative by the MCCC to consolidate cover crop information by state to help farmers make cover crop selections at the county level. The tool makes seeding date recommendations based on county specific weather information, and sorts cover crop species by desirable attributes of the farmer’s choosing. Indiana was the first state in the Midwest to implement a decision tool for field crops and Michigan is currently the only state with a decision tool for vegetable crops. Indiana SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education) is funding the creation of a decision tool for vegetable crops in Indiana this fall. Both the IN field crops tool and MI vegetable tool can be found on the MCCC website (mccc.msu.edu). Figure 1 is[Read More…]


We just completed a new publication that will assist fruit and vegetable growers in protecting pollinators while still managing their insect pests. The title is “Protecting Pollinators in Fruit and Vegetable Production.” It can be found at https://extension.entm.purdue.edu/publications/POL-2/POL-2.html. There are two companion publications in this series, “Protecting Pollinators in Home Lawns and Landscapes” and “Protecting Pollinators: Tips for Commercial Agricultural Pesticide Applicators.” Additional publications in this series will target agronomic crop producers, folks who want to plant a pollinator garden, and how youth can help to protect pollinators.


Over the past several weeks, there have been a number of reports of high populations of aphids on cucurbits, as well as report of disappointing levels of control with various insecticides. Without getting into the specifics of individual complaints, here are some suggestions for improved control of aphids. Remember that our primary method of control of aphids is natural enemies. There are a wide variety of predators and parasites than usually keep aphids at reasonable levels. Usually, an outbreak of aphids is an indication that a grower has done something to kill off the natural enemies, which allows aphid populations to reproduce unchecked. And, aphids have a very high reproductive capacity, so without those natural enemies they can build up in number very quickly. Obviously, there are other pests that cucurbit growers need to control, so some disruption of the natural enemies is to be expected. However, growers should only[Read More…]


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