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Would you like to learn more about biological control and how to use it successfully? New York State Integrated Pest Management biocontrol specialist Amara Dunn has a new blog – “Biocontrol Bytes” (https://blogs.cornell.edu/biocontrolbytes/). Short articles are posted approximately once a month to share information, answer stakeholder questions, and connect readers to other relevant resources. Subscribe using the green button on the right side of the page in order to receive email updates when new articles are posted.


Three videos on in-row weeding tools (Finger weeder, Torsion weeder, Tine harrow) were developed at the Michigan State University Department of Horticulture. Each video is 20 minutes: introduces the tool, how it works, different models, show adjusting the tool in the field, and a short interview with a farmer who uses the tool. These videos can be accessed at the MSU Mechanical Weed Control Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH-k889oYbUaEznvgiDtrOQ


Figure 1. A cucumber plant grown in a high tunnel died because of bacterial wilt.

Bacterial wilt is one of the most destructive diseases in high tunnel cucumber production. The reason bacterial wilt is so important is because, like other wilt diseases, it ties up with the entire vascular system of a plant, causing systemic effects (Figure 1). The relatively less important roles that other cucumber diseases play also make bacterial wilt the major limitation for high tunnel cucumber production in Indiana. For example, common cucumber diseases such as angular leaf spot, anthracnose and Alternaria leaf blight seldom occur in a high tunnel scenario; improved resistance to powdery mildew was observed in some of the newly developed cucumber varieties; downy mildew in general does not occur in Indiana until end of the high tunnel cucumber production season. The causal organism for bacterial wilt of cucumbers is Erwinia tracheiphila. After the bacteria enter the plant vascular system, it multiplies quickly. As a result, it interferes with[Read More…]


The Purdue MELCAST system allows growers to apply foliar fungicides according to weather conditions instead of using a calendar-based system.

MELCAST is a weather-based disease-forecasting program that helps growers schedule foliar fungicides. MELCAST stands for MELon disease forCASTer. This program, designed by Dr. Rick Latin, Professor of Plant Pathology at Purdue University, keeps track of weather conditions so that cantaloupe and watermelon growers can apply foliar fungicides to their crops when they are most needed. The foliar diseases that MELCAST was designed for are Alternaria leaf blight, anthracnose and gummy stem blight. In a typical year, MELCAST will save growers 2 to 3 foliar applications of fungicides without sacrificing yield. MELCAST works by having growers apply fungicides at specific Environmental Favorability Index (EFI) values instead of using a calendar-based schedule. The extension bulletin “Foliar Disease Control using MELCAST” BP-67 describes this program in more detail. To use MELCAST, follow these steps: Apply your first foliar fungicide application when vines first touch within a row or earlier. Find a MELCAST site[Read More…]


Entomologists are looking for growers willing to participate in research examining the detection and distribution of striped cucumber beetles. We would like to visit your fields on multiple occasions this year to count the number of cucumber beetles we encounter in your crop. If you grow slicing cucumbers in the field, and are interested in helping to improve our sampling recommendations for this pest, please contact Dr. Laura Ingwell at (765) 494-6167 or lingwell@purdue.edu


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Southwest Purdue Ag Center High Tunnel Tour Date: June 13, 2018 7:00-9:00 pm Eastern Time Location: Southwest Purdue Agricultural Center, 4369 North Purdue Road, Vincennes, IN, 47591 The SWPAC high tunnel tour will be held on the evening of June 13, 2018. Topics that will be discussed include: Grafting cucumbers for season extension; Seedless cucumber and summer squash variety evaluations in a high tunnel; Different pruning and trellising systems for growing cucumber, tomato and pepper in a high tunnel; Grafting tomatoes for improved yield; Cucumber beetle management; Annual plasticultural strawberry production with an innovative low tunnel system. Registration will begin at 6:30 pm. The tour is free; to register please call (812) 886-0198. For more information please contact Wenjing Guan (guan40@purdue.edu). This event is sponsored by North-Central Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education.   2018 Indiana Hort Society Summer Field Day Date: June 26 Location: Garwood Orchard, LaPorte, IN Please contact[Read More…]


Produce display with FoodLink

Would you buy something if you didn’t understand how it worked or what to do with it? Likely not… Imagine a customer of yours who doesn’t know how to select, prepare or store the fresh healthful produce that you are growing and offering for sale. How likely is it that they will buy that product? Or buy it twice? What are we doing at the point of sale to encourage that purchase? Your produce may be cosmetically perfect and 100% healthful but is it able to communicate to the customer anything about its selection, use or how much their family will enjoy it if prepared properly? Most every packaged, ready to eat, value added product in the grocery store is designed to convey these messages in a loud and clear format…Have you seen the breakfast cereal aisle in the grocery store lately? Those products are conveying an undeniable “BUY ME” message and they are directly competing for customer dollars with your silent but beautiful (and healthful) produce every day. There[Read More…]


Nematology lab at Purdue University will be closing at the end of June. The first of June is the last day the lab will accept samples. A list of private and public nematology labs can be found here. Please contact these labs for their requirements for nematode sample submission. Click here to view the listing for private and public nematology laboratories.


Figure 1. Seedling tray covered in light foam material for shipping.

Thinking of sending samples of your vegetables to the Plant and Pest Diagnostic Lab for diagnosis or insect ID? Here are some tips to help the samples arrive in the best possible condition for testing. Fill out a sample submission form. Download at: https://ag.purdue.edu/btny/ppdl/Pages/physicalspecimens.aspx If sending more than one kind of plant or problem be sure to label each bag specifically and fill out a separate form. The PPDL is closed on weekend so if you are sending samples make sure you send them early in the week so they are not in transit over a weekend. Express delivery (next day or second day) is preferred for samples that may not hold up well. You are also welcome to deliver samples to us on campus. See our website for location, parking and other information. Information we need to make the most of your sample: Symptoms you are seeing (your main[Read More…]


This article provides more detailed information about this herbicide. How does Chateau® herbicide work Chateau® is a group 14 mode-of-action herbicide. Compounds in this group are most active on broadleaf weeds. Before Chateau® became available,  no other preemergence herbicide with the same mode of action was labeled for use in watermelons and cantaloupes. The active ingredient of Chateau® herbicide, flumioxazin, controls susceptible weeds by inhibiting propoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO), an enzyme that controls chlorophyll synthesis. Because of chlorophyll production inhibition, a chain reaction occurs within the plant that causes cell membrane disruption. Chateau® herbicide can assist in the postemergence control of emerged weeds. It is taken up by roots, stems, or leaves of young plants. It kills weeds through direct contact. There is usually little or no translocation of the herbicide within plants. Foliage necrosis can be observed after 4 to 6 hours of sunlight following the herbicide application. Susceptible plants[Read More…]


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