565 articles


Ever year, I put together fungicide schedules for cucurbits. These may be found at purdue.ag/pumpkinfs and purdue.ag/melonfs. They may be downloaded as PDFs on legal sized pages.  Please use these tables along with the MW Vegetable Production Guide and the fungicide label.  If you have trouble with accessing the tables or have other questions. please let me know.


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No reason exists to expect drought anytime soon in Indiana, with much of the state remaining rather wet after last weekend’s showers. One good new development exists. The precipitation pattern that has existed since nearly January seems to be becoming a little less predictable, which could mean more periods of drier weather between fronts on the horizon. Another bit of good news exists in above normal temperatures predicted on both the 7-10 and 8-14 day forecasts, according to the Climate Prediction Center (https://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/), which would allow for quicker drying of soils after any precipitation that does fall. Current growing degree days (base 50) for 2019, as of April 22, vary from 206 in Indianapolis to 322 in Evansville to 111 in Angola, marking a clear gradient in insect development and greening from south to north.  The entire state is now monitoring conditions for issuance of frost/freeze warnings from the NWS,[Read More…]


From time to time, I will make changes to the MW Vegetable Production Guide.   These changes will appear automatically in the on-line version.  For those who purchase a hard copy, watch the Vegetable Crops Hotline for changes. See below for the changes that have been made to the Production guide for 2019   Page Comment 1 Add “Anthony Hanson, IPM program” under contributors, University of Minnesota 117 Under powdery mildew, last sentence in disease notes-“Protect pumpkin vines until approximately 21 days from last harvest.” 128 FRAC code for Actigard should be P01 147 Buckeye rot products, Orondis Opti 3-day PHI. 148 Under late blight, Orondis Opti 3-day PHI. 164 Footnote 2 should read “X=permitted for at least one crop.” Footnote 3 should read “X=may be used for that crop.  *=processing crops only.” 226 Define herbicide should be omitted.  


The Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers 2018 is available for sale as a hardcopy ($15) or free on-line (be sure to check the article in this issue about changes that have been made to the on-line version).  Actually, the Vegetable Guide has been available since last December. The guide may be purchased through the Education Store, at various extension meetings held around the state or from your Purdue University county educator. The website to either view or purchase the Guide, known in Indiana as the ID-56, is mwveguide.org. The Midwest Vegetable Production Guide is a collaboration of 8 states and 9 institutions. Are you thinking that you already have a Vegetable Guide from a past year and wondering if it is worth getting a new one? The article below represents just some of the changes to this year’s Vegetable Guide.  New and Revised Sections The three new tables created last year — Selected Information About[Read More…]


Southwest Purdue Agricultural Center Field Day Date: June 27, 2019. Registration begins at 8:30 am. Location: Southwest Purdue Agricultural Center, 4669 N. Purdue Road in Vincennes, IN 47591 Topics related to vegetable production include: Organic Tomato Production: Dan Egel will discuss the Tomato Organic Management and Improvement Project — including foliar disease management of tomatoes. High Tunnel Grafted Cucumber & Specialty Melon Production: Wenjing Guan and Petrus Langenhoven will discuss cucumber and melon production in high tunnels. Applying IPM Principles across Cropping Systems to Increase Insect Pollination and Profitability: Laura Ingwell will discuss best management practices for watermelon production by quantifying pest pressures, pollinator health, and crop yields. Annual Strawberry Production: Wenjing Guan will discuss annual plastic culture for strawberry production in southern Indiana. Other topics include: Termites to the Rescue: In this presentation, Rick Meilan will discuss the use of enzymes derived from termites to control invasive woody species. Removing[Read More…]


Figure 4. Connect four stakes in a rectangle shape (A), cross the hook (12’’) with the central-string (B) and hook it to the side-strings between the two tomato plants (C).

The Florida-weave or sometimes called stake and weave is a commonly used tomato trellis system (Figure 1). It has several benefits and is easy to implement. However, sometimes the plants grow too tall and can hardly be supported by the stakes, or they may be too vigorous and break the strings. In this article, we will introduce an alternative tomato trellis system, Spanish-weave, and discuss its usage in tomato production. How to trellis tomato plants with the Spanish-weave system? Materials: tomato stakes, tomato strings, and hooks. We made the hooks from steel wire. They were made at 4-inch, 8-inch and 12-inch length (Figure 2). Prune bottom leaves of the tomato plant and suckers until the first flower cluster (Figure 3). Install tomato stakes on each side of the rows at every two tomato plants (A); Tie strings across the two wooden stakes at the beginning and the end of each[Read More…]


Figure 3: Fusarium wilt symptoms on watermelon transplant.

A recent observation of gummy stem blight on a watermelon transplant has reminded me to remind growers to inspect seedlings. Whether one is growing transplants or receiving transplants for delivery, seedlings should be inspected for possible disease problems. If one is uncertain of the cause of the symptoms, an official diagnosis can be obtained by sending the sample to the Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic. Below I will describe several common transplant diseases of cantaloupe and watermelon as well as management options. I have had similar articles in the Hotline in the past, however, I will use new photos here. Gummy stem blight on transplant seedlings may be recognized by the water-soaked area of the stem near the seed leaves. In this article, I will show a leaf with a lesion of gummy stem blight (Figure 1). A closer look (one may need a 10X hand-lens) at any gummy stem[Read More…]


Figure 2. Beetles are attracted to the color yellow and to the lures within the jugs. Once they find their way inside, they have difficulty finding their way out, eventually falling into the soapy water to die.

Have you ever wondered how striped cucumber beetles manage to find your cucurbits every year? Striped cucumber beetles rely on sight and smell to find food. They are particularly attracted to the color yellow and to scents produced by cucurbit flowers and male striped cucumber beetles. This summer we studied how we could use lures that imitate cucurbit flowers and live beetles for mass trapping with yellow gallon jugs. On one farm, 16 traps captured 2,363 striped cucumber beetles from late May through early September (Figure 1). The vast majority of these beetles were captured in May and August. In May, the beetles were most attracted to the control jugs, but in August, beetles preferred jugs containing live beetles and floral lures. If you place traps early in the season—before or as striped cucumber beetles begin to emerge—we recommend using only yellow jugs without any lures or live beetles. If[Read More…]


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I know as producers of some of the finest fruits, veggies, herbs and flowers in Indiana no one is more excited to welcome Spring and a new market year than YOU! Whether or not you have used FoodLink in the past as a way to increase consumer knowledge of and interest in your products we wanted to make sure that you have full access to FoodLink resources. We want to give you the resources to reach more customers and bring them to your food and continue to return.  You can order more resources from the Ed Store to help you in your marketing efforts or print items off using our PDF resources. FoodLink resources ae FREE to use and are waiting only for your innovative application in your displays, marketing materials, promotional ads (traditional media OR better…SOCIAL MEDIA) and packaging materials. Be on the lookout for upcoming social media posts that are rolling out starting[Read More…]


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