5 articles tagged "Potatoes".

I have received some reports of Colorado potato beetles damaging both potatoes and tomatoes, including tomatoes in high tunnels. Both the adults and larvae are voracious feeders. As with most pests, it is best to get potato beetles under control before the populations get too high. Also, killing small larvae is easier than killing large ones, so spraying earlier will provide better control. We have had numerous reports of resistance to the pyrethroids in Indiana, so I generally don’t recommend those products. If you try one and it works, then you probably don’t have a resistant population at this point. For most of the state, I recommend one of the following products, Admire Pro®, Agri-Mek®, Assail, Coragen®, Exirel®, Radiant®, and Rimon®. Note that Coragen® and Radiant® cannot be used in high tunnels.


​In 2014 and 2015 blackleg-like symptoms were observed in some U.S. potato growing areas. The presence of a bacterium of the species Dickeya was confirmed by PCR testing. Symptoms caused from this pathogen may include leaf wilts and tuber soft rots which may extend internally up the vascular system of the stem. USDA APHIS PPQ would like to determine if Dickeya spp. are present in Indiana. If you are a potato grower and have observed the symptoms described here, contact Dan Egel.


​Late blight has been reported on processing tomatoes in Cass County Indiana. This is a late blight update from when this disease was reported on potatoes and tomatoes in LaGrange County Indiana. The latter outbreak and some disease management tips are reported in the Vegetable Crops Hotline Issue 603 at ag.purdue.edu/hla/Extension/VegCropsHotline/Pages/Latest-Articles.aspx?article=117 This article was originally published on the veggiediseaseblog.org on August 24, 2015.


Late blight can cause brown necrotic lesions on tomato leaves that may be surrounded by growth of the causal fungus under moist conditions (Photo: Tom Creswell).

​Late blight has been reported on potatoes and tomatoes in LaGrange County.Potato and tomato growers in northern Indiana should follow the management recommendations listed below and in the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers 2015 (ID-56). Late blight thrives under cool, wet conditions. The disease can easily spread from plant to plant. Under ideal conditions, the disease can spread rapidly, causing symptoms on all above ground plant parts (Figure 1). The lesions may be green to brown and under moist conditions may be ringed with white fungal growth. Affected tomato fruit may have large brown lesions. The fungus-like organism that causes late blight does not usually overwinter in Indiana. Therefore, the disease must be blown or brought into Indiana. All strains of the fungus-like organism that affect tomato will cause disease on potato. However, not all potato strains will affect tomatoes. It is best for tomato and potato growers[Read More…]


I’ve seen some substantial populations of potato leafhoppers recently. Leafhoppers can be a significant pest of a number of vegetable crops, with potato and snap beans being particularly affected. Look for adults flitting off the plants when they are disturbed and for nymphs feeding on the underside of the leaves. It is important not to wait until you see symptoms (hopper burn) before you take action. Scouting is the best way to avoid leafhopper injury.


Vegetable Crops Hotline - Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture 625 Agriculture Mall Dr. West Lafayette, IN 47907

© 2017 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by Vegetable Crops Hotline

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact Vegetable Crops Hotline at guan40@purdue.edu.