Liz Maynard

Clinical Engagement Assistant Professor of Horticulture
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture
Liz Maynard's website

78 articles by this author

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​The Southwest Indiana Melon and Vegetable Growers Association will hold their technical meeting and variety trial showcase on Thursday, December 3rd at the Southwest Purdue Ag Center, 4369 N. Purdue Road, Vincennes, IN. The meeting will start at 6:00 P.M., dinner will be served. At approximately 7:00 P.M., the variety trial discussion will begin. Any grower interested in becoming a member is invited to attend. Membership dues are $15 per year and can be paid at the meeting. If you have questions or want to RSVP, please contact Barb Joyner or Dan Egel at 812-886-0198 or email joynerb@purdue.edu. RSVP are due by November 20th.


​Beginning Farmer Tour. Saturday, November 7, 2015. 9:00 A.M. – Noon CST. Perkins Good Earth Farm, DeMotte, IN. Breakfast, networking session, lunch, tour. Soil health, cover crops, vegetable and high tunnel production. Sponsored by Purdue Extension and Local Growers Guild. For more information and to register contact the Purdue Extension Education Store at https://www.edustore.purdue.edu/ or 888-EXT-INFO. Southwest Indiana Melon and Vegetable Growers Association Technical Meeting and Variety Trial Showcase. Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015. 6:00 P.M. dinner, 7:00 P.M. Variety Trial Showcase. SWPAC, 4369 N. Purdue Rd., Vincennes, IN. RSVP by November 20 by phone 812-886-0198 or email joynerb@purdue.edu. Illiana Vegetable Growers Symposium. Tuesday, January 5, 2016. 8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. CST. Teibel’s Restaurant, Schererville, IN. Registration and program available in early December. Contact Liz Maynard, 219-548-3674 or vegcrops@purdue.edu. Indiana Horticultural Congress. January 19-21, 2016. Wyndham Indianapolis West, Indianapolis, IN. www.inhortcongress.org. Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, 765-494-1296 or ljollybr@purdue.edu. Midwest Women in[Read More…]


​Do you have an idea that might help your farm stay in business for the long run? Be a better place to work or contribute more to the community? Conserve or improve natural resources like soil and water? Reduce use of fossil fuels? The North Central Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program (NCR SARE) of the USDA wants to fund ideas like these and others to make agriculture more sustainable – economically, socially, and environmentally. The 2016 Farmer Rancher Grant Program of NCR SARE offers grants for farmer-initiated projects of up to $7,500 for individuals, $15,000 for partners, and $22,500 for groups. Grant applications are due in the NCR SARE office on Thursday, December 3, 2015. To learn more about the grants and download a grant application, visit http://www.northcentralsare.org/Grants/Apply-for-a-Grant. To receive a hard copy of the application NCR-SARE, at 612-626-3113. NCR SARE also offers Partnership Grants to fund on-farm[Read More…]


Indiana Hort Congress Flyer

​Arthritis and Agriculture. Thursday, September 24, 2015. 12:00 P.M. – 1:00 P.M. EDT. Presenter: Amber D. Wolfe, M.S., from the National AgrAbility project. To participate, register at https://goo.gl/R8Eq1I. You will then receive a confirmation email with the link to participate in the webinar. You will also receive a reminder 24 hours before the webinar begins. Funding Opportunities for Farmers and Others. Wednesday, October 7, 2015. 10:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. EDT. Webinar. To participate go to this URL on Oct. 7: https://purdue.webex.com/join/rballard. This program will provide a basic introduction to some of the current grants, applicant eligibility, and how to apply for funding. Roy Ballard, Purdue Extension Educator, ANR, Hancock County/ Indiana SARE Coordinator will offer basic information about the available grants, insight on SARE priorities. Kris Parker, Purdue Community Development Regional Educator, will offer a few tips for grant writing success in 2016 and beyond. Questions? Contact Roy at[Read More…]


Photo of Dr. Amanda Deering

​Amanda Deering started her Extension/Research appointment July 1, 2015 in a new role as a Clinical Assistant Professor in fresh produce food safety. Amanda grew up on a farm in a small farming community located in the “thumb” of Michigan and joined the Food Science department in the fall of 2013 as a Research Assistant Professor. Amanda earned her bachelor’s degree in biology and master’s degree in plant biology from Central Michigan University. She completed her Ph.D. at Purdue University in food microbiology and food safety specializing in fresh produce food safety. Her research focuses on examining internalization of human pathogenic bacteria in plants, as well as routes of contamination that can contribute to plants harboring pathogenic bacteria. Amanda works closely with industry to develop and test novel sanitization treatments that can be used for fresh produce. She also has been involved in research and Extension activities related to preventing foodborne illness associated[Read More…]


Solid green stems on fully mature pumpkins make a quality jack-o-lantern. (Photo by Liz Maynard)

​Pumpkin season is here. Keeping up with best management practices through harvest and storage will help the year wrap up on a good note. The steps below are a reminder of actions that can make a difference. Handle fruit as little as possible. Harvest fully orange and healthy pumpkins. Half-orange pumpkins may turn orange but quality and storage life will be reduced. Use a sharp knife or loppers to cut pumpkins from the vine. Leave stems long enough for an attractive product. Carry the pumpkin like a ball, not by the stem, or ‘handle.’ Brush off soil that sticks to the pumpkin. If pumpkins are washed, include a labeled sanitizer in the wash water and dry pumpkins before storage. Place pumpkins carefully in crates, bins, or trucks, so that the stem of one pumpkin doesn’t damage the rind of another. Watch for and avoid (or pad) sharp edges that could[Read More…]


Kale varieties growing in test plot.

​If you grow kale you may be interested in the ‘You Heart Kale’ effort promoted by Indiana’s Farm to School program for this year’s Food Day. The “Kale Toolkit”  provided by the Indiana Dept. of Education encourages schools to buy kale from local farmers, plant kale in the school garden, let students taste-test kale recipes, and serve kale in the school cafeteria to celebrate Food Day. Food Day is October 24, but schools can pick any day in October to have their official celebration. The toolkit also includes kale recipes that might be of interest to direct marketers. Learn more about Farm to School in Indiana at www.doe.in.gov/nutrition/farm-school.



​Beginning Farmer Tours. Free farm tours and networking events sponsored by Purdue Extension and Local Growers Guild. For more information and to register contact the Purdue Extension Education Store at www.edustore.purdue.edu or 888-EXT-INFO. September 8: Growing Places Indy, Indianapolis, IN. Lunch, networking session, tour. Urban produce farm with raised beds, u-pick, and greenhouses. September 14: Morning Harvest, Palmyra and Hardinsburg, IN. Breakfast, networking session, lunch and tour. Developing local markets for produce, including marketing to institutions such as hospitals and schools, hydroponic lettuce, herbs, strawberries, and more. October 11: Simpson Family Farm, Martinville, IN. Lunch, networking session, tour. Grassfed beef, pastured pork, and poultry. November 7: Perkins Good Earth Farm, DeMotte, IN. Breakfast, networking session, lunch, tour. Soil health, cover crops, vegetable and high tunnel production. Arthritis and Agriculture. Thursday, September 24, 2015. 12:00 P.M. – 1:00 P.M. EDT. Presenter: Amber D. Wolfe, M.S., from the National AgrAbility project. To[Read More…]


Office: 812-886-0198

Dr. Wenjing Guan comes to Purdue from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, where she was a Horticultural Specialist working on season extension for vegetable production. She was involved in research projects to establish planting calendars for organically produced warm season (tomato, cucumber and pepper) and cool season (lettuce, spinach and pak choi) vegetables in high tunnels, and participated in strawberry variety evaluation under organically managed high tunnel systems. Wenjing received her Ph.D. at the University of Florida, with the dissertation project focusing on specialty melon production and vegetable grafting. She conducted specialty melon variety evaluations under conventional and organic production systems in Florida, and investigated yield, disease resistance and fruit quality of melons grafted onto hybrid squash and African horned cucumber rootstocks. Her research showed grafting is a promising practice to control soil-borne diseases and could potentially increase yield. Taking the position as a horticulturist at the Southwest[Read More…]