39 articles tagged "Greenhouses & High Tunnels".

Consumers love cucumbers that are sweet, seedless and have thin skins. They are willing to pay high prices for the long or mini cucumbers sold at grocery stores. These cucumbers are often grown in greenhouses and shipped long distances. It will attract consumers’ attention if greenhouse type cucumbers can be produced locally in high tunnels, and be available in the early-season’s market. There are at least three benefits for targeting early-season cucumber production. First, prices are higher; second, there are less pest problems; and third, things are going slower in early seasons compared to in the summer. However, we all know that cucumbers love high temperatures and do not grow well when soil temperature is low, even in high tunnels. This is especially true for the greenhouse type cucumbers. The situation may be changed with the use of grafting technology. Using squash as rootstocks, we were able to harvest cucumbers[Read More…]


When we first began working in high tunnels about 8 years ago, most of the popular literature said that the tunnels would provide protection from most insect pests, other than the usual greenhouse pests like aphids and mites. What we found very quickly is that that information was untrue. We found very high populations of a variety of insect pests within our high tunnels. Caterpillars of various types seem to be especially problematic in high tunnels. Our theory is that the moths fly into the tunnel and can’t figure out how to escape, so the females just lay their eggs on the crop they can reach. The key to managing these caterpillars is regular scouting and treating early. For the crop you are growing, look for the products recommend in the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for caterpillars, then check Table 16 on page 45 to see if it can be[Read More…]


Figure 1. A 30% black shade cloth was added to one of the high tunnels

Tomatoes growing in high tunnels are in the middle of or close to harvest. Developing and maturing fruit are under leaf canopies. On the top of the plants, many flowers are still blooming. These flowers will contribute to the second big harvest. Although tomatoes in June are most valuable, we certainly appreciate big, red and delicious tomatoes in July and August.  To ensure a sustained yield, it is important for these flowers to set fruit. The process of fruit set is very sensitive to excessively high temperatures. When temperatures rise above 100°F, even just for a few hours for a handful of days, tomato flowers may be aborted and fruit set fail. Night temperatures above 75°F may also cause tomato fruit set failure. In addition to fruit set, high temperatures affect fruit ripening process. Ethylene associated ripening decreases markedly at a temperature above 93°F. As a result, there might be an increasing number of[Read More…]


thumbnail image

Every grower will have to do some basic calculations when mixing a nutrient solution. Understanding some of the calculations will help you to apply the correct concentration of a nutrient or determine the concentrations of a combination of nutrients applied. In the previous article Taking Care of Plant Nutrition in Your High Tunnel-Water Hardness and the Removal of Unwanted Ions, we have discussed how to manage hard water, and unwanted high concentrations of sodium, chloride, iron, manganese and sulfur. Growers have different nutrient solution mixing and application options. Depending on the size of your high tunnel or greenhouse operation and the sophistication level of your nutrient solution application system, you might decide to use a single-bag mix (contains all needed elements), a two-bag mix (Tank A-calcium and iron, and half of potassium nitrate; Tank B-all other elements including phosphates and sulfates), or an individual element mix (individual compound fertilizers). The[Read More…]


It is essential, especially in hydroponics to start with a laboratory analysis of your source water. It is also important to do follow-up analysis throughout the year. Water quality can change especially where the water source is a well or a pond. In the article Taking Care of Plant Nutrition in Your High Tunnel-Water Alkalinity (Issue 627), we have discussed the importance of water alkalinity and how to correct high alkalinity levels. Additional elements of importance are Ca, Mg, S, Na, Cl, Fe and Mn. Knowing concentrations of these ions can help you to determine the need to purify water, leach or bleed more frequently, as well as to avoid these contaminants by choosing the appropriate fertilizer. Hard water might be generally associated with high alkalinity, but it is not always the case. Water hardness is a measure of the amount of dissolved calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), expressed as if[Read More…]


One of the most damaging pests in cucurbit production are cucumber beetles and the bacterial pathogen they transmit (Erwinia trachephila), leading to bacterial wilt.  In the recently released video, Dr. Laura Ingwell from Purdue Entomology demonstrates how to install insect exclusion screens on high tunnels. Such screens are effective at excluding cucumber beetles and the pathogen they transmit from high tunnels. 


In the past I have had many conversations with growers about plant nutrition in their high tunnels. A good plant nutrient management plan is an integral part of making a success of the crop you are growing. Plant nutrition is important to grow a strong and healthy seedling, the first step of a successful crop. Fertility management of especially vining crops (e.g. tomato, cucumber, peppers) are critical to achieving a good yield. It does not matter if you grow your crop in soil or in a soilless production system. Steering your crop to have the optimum balance between vegetative and reproductive growth will result in good yields over a longer period. It is important for growers to know what is in their water and soil. Therefore, soil analysis of a representative sample of the area that will be planted, and water analysis of a water sample from the source that[Read More…]


A tomato leaf with necrotic rings caused by tomato spotted wilt virus.

While many virus diseases affect pepper and tomato plants, in the Midwest, the most common virus diseases of these two crops are tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INVV).  These diseases are usually observed in greenhouse or high tunnel situations. The two viruses, TSWV and INSV are closely related. In fact, at one time, they were both considered TSWV. Therefore, the symptoms, biology and management of these two diseases are similar. This article discusses the symptoms, biology and management of these two diseases. Both TSWV and INSV affect many hosts, including vegetables and flowering ornamentals. Symptoms vary according to host, stage of plant affected and environmental conditions. Both diseases can cause stunting, yellowing, necrotic rings, leaf mottle and more. Figure 1 shows a tomato leaf with necrotic rings caused by TSWV. Figure 2 shows a pepper transplant with ring spots caused by INSV. Additional symptoms may[Read More…]


: These lesions of bacterial speck of tomato were observed on a tomato transplant for sale to homeowners at a retail outlet. Tomato transplants should be inspected for disease symptoms during production or at delivery.

Many Indiana growers may have tomato transplants growing in a greenhouse for field or greenhouse/high tunnel production. The three most likely diseases are bacterial spot, bacterial speck and bacterial canker. This article describes symptoms for these diseases and some management options. While these bacterial diseases thrive in transplant production where plants are often overhead watered, these diseases are not common on tomatoes grown to maturity in greenhouses or high tunnels. This is because, for the most part, tomatoes grown to maturity in a greenhouse or high tunnel do not have the necessary leaf wetness required for these diseases. Bacterial canker is occasionally observed in greenhouse/high tunnel situations since this disease may become established in transplants and becomes systemic in plants. Once bacterial canker is systemic in the plant, it ‘spreads’ within each plant even if it does not spread from plant to plant. Bacterial speck and spot – The symptoms produced by these two diseases are[Read More…]


Figure 1. Lettuce in high tunnel showing symptoms of lettuce drop caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiurum. Photo by Erin Bluhm.

Some of the red and green multi-leaf lettuce plants in Figure 1 are wilted and closer inspection reveals death and soft decay at the crown and well as freeze damage (Figure 2). Getting even closer as in Figure 3 we see white fuzzy mold and find hard black sclerotia 1/8 to ¼ inch across and up to ½ inch long at the base of the plants and in the soil. These sclerotia confirm that the plants have succumbed to white mold or lettuce drop caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The lettuce was transplanted in September or October 2016 and the photos taken in mid to late January. We continue to see more plants succumbing to the disease. Infection by this fungus begins when sclerotia buried in the soil produce small mushroom-like apothecia and spores from the apothecia land on susceptible plant tissue, germinate, and invade the plant. Sclerotia can[Read More…]


Vegetable Crops Hotline - Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture 625 Agriculture Mall Dr. West Lafayette, IN 47907

© 2017 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by Vegetable Crops Hotline

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact Vegetable Crops Hotline at guan40@purdue.edu.