2 articles tagged "Varieties".

Figure 2. A seedless cucumber

A plant is considered to be seedless if it is able to produce a fruit without or contain a much-reduced number of seeds, or in some cases, only present traces of aborted seeds. Seedlessness is a desirable fruit character because seeds are often hard, have a bad taste and produce hormones that lead to fruit deterioration. As a result, seedless fruit often has better quality and longer shelf lives. Seedless watermelons that were introduced in the 1990s have become the main type of watermelons grown in the U.S.  Besides seedless watermelons, breeders have developed seedless varieties for other fruiting vegetables. This article briefly introduces the different types of seedless fruit and discusses potential opportunities for growing theses varieties. Seedlessness exists in two forms. In the case of seedless watermelons, the fruit contains partially formed seeds that are aborted after fertilization (Figure 1.). Seedless watermelon plants are self-infertile. They must be[Read More…]


Figure 1. Seedless watermelon varieties in 2016 variety trial that have unique rind patterns

— Notes from Watermelon Research and Development Group Annual Meeting and 2016 Indiana Watermelon Variety Trial We are proud to be in Vincennes, the heart of watermelon producing counties in Indiana. In case you are unfamiliar with watermelon production here, Indiana is just behind Florida, Texas, Georgia, California and South Carolina in watermelon production nationwide. Indiana has more than 7,000 acres of watermelons valued at over $30 million value. In the recent Watermelon Research and Development Group (WRDG) annual meeting, the group that comprise members from academia, government and industry discussed watermelon varieties. In this article, I will summarize my notes from this year’s meeting and discuss the varieties we tested in Indiana watermelon variety trials in 2016. Mini-watermelons One of the interesting things I learned in the meeting is from a talk by Mr. Greg Hitt from Walmart. He shared data that shows Walmart increased the sale of mini watermelons[Read More…]


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