22 articles tagged "Pumpkins".

​As you all know, many of our vegetable crops are dependent upon pollinators to move pollen from flower to flower. The cucurbits, muskmelons, cucumbers, watermelons, pumpkins, and squash, are completely dependent on insect pollination. Eggplant, okra, lima beans, and peppers will set fruit without pollinators but can have increased yield if pollinators are present. Honey bees are likely the most important pollinators for most of these crops, but other pollinators such as a number of species of native bees and other insects can also provide useful pollination services. In recent years, there has been a lot of attention given to larger than normal die off of honey bee colonies, commonly referred to as colony collapse disorder. There has been a great deal of discussion in the scientific community and in the public about the cause or causes of these colony deaths. Some of the suspected causes include new disease organisms,[Read More…]


Bacterial spot of pumpkin often causes scab-like lesions on pumpkins. In this photo

The title of this article is pretty scary. But it isn’t entirely accurate. Pumpkins won’t really rot from the inside out. In this article, I will describe one way in which pumpkins can seem to rot from the inside out. Recently, I was asked to visit a field of pumpkins where the pumpkins were soft and rotting. Some of the pumpkins had already burst. Some were soft and when prodded, the insides flowed out. I set out to try to understand how this could happen. Although it seemed that the rotted pumpkins were healthy on the outside, upon closer examination, I found lesions of bacterial spot on the outside of affected pumpkins. More information about bacterial spot can be found in Vegetable Crops Hotline No. 586. Most lesions of bacterial spot on pumpkin are scab-like on the surface of the pumpkin (see Figure 1). Occasionally, however, such lesions will become[Read More…]


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