67 articles tagged "Tomato".

Recently, this disease was observed in a greenhouse in Indiana. This article will serve as a review of this important disease. The symptoms of bacterial canker vary considerably. In most cases, the edges of the leaves may turn yellow and/or brown. That is, the margins of the leaves may become chlorotic and/or necrotic (Figure 1). This symptom, which is sometimes known as ‘firing’, may be more common in a field situation than in a greenhouse. Tomato plants may wilt as a result of bacterial canker. The inside of the stem of affected plants may be discolored brown (Figure 2). The fruit may have bird’s-eye spots-this symptoms is more common in field outbreaks.  In the greenhouse where this disease was recently observed, adventitious root development was observed on the stems of affected plants. That is, the stems may develop a ‘bumpy’ appearance where extra roots are starting to develop. However, this symptom may also develop from stresses[Read More…]


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We went through an unseasonably cold period in early April (Figure 1). In southern Indiana, a few high tunnel tomato growers have already planted their crops. These plants may need some extra help. In Vincennes, IN, we used row covers to cover the newly planted tomatoes in high tunnels the past few nights, our recorded lowest temperature was 37 °F under row covers. Plants all look good. However, the temperature is apparently too cold for cucumbers. The majority of the early planted cucumbers in our high tunnels were dead. We are waiting for the weather to warm up (soil temperature at least above 60 °F) to reset the cucumbers. Please let us know if you also ran into problems in the past a few days because of the low temperature. It might be issues in the greenhouse, the high tunnels, or even the field. We would appreciate you sharing your experiences with us.      


Lettuce is grown in channels using the Nutrient Film Technique

Travelling through Indiana last summer, I realized that many growers plant their crops in soil inside their high tunnels or greenhouses. Soilless production offers different benefits and challenges. This is the first article in a series focusing on soilless crop production in high tunnels and greenhouses. Today we are discussing Hydroponics. What is Hydroponics?  The word hydroponics technically means ‘working water’, derived from the Latin words “hydro” meaning water and “ponos” meaning labor. Hydroponics is a method to grow plants using a mineral nutrient solution, in water and without soil. Two types of hydroponics are commonly found: a) solution culture, and b) medium culture. Solution culture types include continuous flow solution culture (Nutrient Film Technique) and Aeroponics. Medium culture types include ebb and flow sub-irrigation, run to waste, deep water culture and passive sub-irrigation systems. History.  The first research published on the production of spearmint in water was conducted by[Read More…]


One way insects communicate with individuals of the same species is with pheromones. Pheromones are volatile chemicals released by an insect that usually can be detected only by individuals of the same species. There are a number of different types of pheromones, but the most common type is the sex pheromone. Usually the females will emit a tiny amount of a chemical that attracts the male to her and increases the likelihood of mating. Because the chemical is volatile, air currents carry it. The male detects the pheromone in the air with receptors on his antennae. He then flies upwind to find the source of the pheromone, a prospective mate. The chemical compositions of pheromones for a number of pest species have been identified and synthetic copies can be produced in the laboratory. Synthetic pheromones can be used in conjunction with traps to catch male insects. Listed below are some, but[Read More…]


Tomatoes grown in controlled environment are exposed to conditions that are different from their original habitats. As a result, varieties that are not specifically bred for greenhouse production may respond to the controlled environment with abnormal symptoms. One group of the symptoms is called edema. Bumps, galls or blisters develop on tomato leaves, petioles or stems (Figure 1). In severe conditions, it causes leaf curling, distortion and abscission (Figure 2). A couple of factors including high humidity, excessive water in the soil, air pollution, and low light condition could cause the symptom. Tomato varieties respond differently in susceptibility to the physiological disorder, and the primary contributing factors can also be different among tomato varieties. The most severe case of edema that we have observed so far is on tomato rootstocks including ‘Maxifort’. This is not surprising as most of the commercial tomato rootstocks are hybrid of wild tomatoes Lycopersicon esculentum[Read More…]


A grafted tomato plant growing in a high tunnel. (Photo by Wenjing Guan)

​You might have heard about tomato grafting, or you might even already have tried the new technique. Yes, it has multiple benefits: control of soilborne diseases, enhanced tolerance to abiotic stresses, and increased productivity. It works for some growers, but not all. Why? There are several reasons. First, effects of grafting on controlling soilborne diseases depend on the presence of the disease that the rootstock is designed to control. For example, grafting might not be very helpful for white mold, because current commercial rootstocks do not have resistance to white mold. However, grafting might work if the primary problem is Fusarium crown and root rot, as most commercial tomato rootstocks have resistance to this disease. With that said, it is very important to look at the disease resistance profile before deciding on the rootstocks. Second, grafting effects on improving yield depend on factors such as scion and rootstock cultivars, cultural[Read More…]


Cercospora leaf mold symptoms on the upper leaf surface. Note distinct chlorotic lesions. Photo by Dan Egel.

​ This disease does not typically affect Indiana tomatoes, instead preferring tomatoes grown in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Since Cercospora leaf mold was observed in two different areas of Indiana in the 2015 season, it makes sense for growers to become aware of this disease in case it returns to Indiana in 2016. The two locations where Cercospora leaf mold was observed in Indiana in 2015 were 1) a homeowner garden in southern Indiana and 2) a high tunnel in central Indiana. The fungus that causes Cercospora leaf mold, Pseudocercospora fuligena, normally does not overwinter outside of tropical and subtropical areas. It may be that a wind blew the fungus in from the south in 2015. Symptoms of Cercospora leaf mold are similar to leaf mold caused by Passalora fulva. Both diseases cause chlorotic (yellow) lesions which are visible on the upper side of the leaf. The chlorotic area caused by Cercospora leaf mold is[Read More…]


​Late blight has been reported on processing tomatoes in Cass County Indiana. This is a late blight update from when this disease was reported on potatoes and tomatoes in LaGrange County Indiana. The latter outbreak and some disease management tips are reported in the Vegetable Crops Hotline Issue 603 at ag.purdue.edu/hla/Extension/VegCropsHotline/Pages/Latest-Articles.aspx?article=117 This article was originally published on the veggiediseaseblog.org on August 24, 2015.


(Photo by Dan Egel)

​We have received a number of reports of outbreaks of spider mites, primarily in watermelons and in high tunnels. The problems in high tunnels are not unexpected because one of the primary causes of mortality in mite populations is rainfall washing them off the plants and, of course, that is lacking completely in high tunnels. With all the rain we have had, it’s a little surprising that we are seeing problems in watermelons, but the older I get, the less I’m surprised by how infrequently arthropods behave the way we expect them to. In both scenarios, we don’t really have treatment thresholds for mites. Generally speaking, if populations are increasing, they need to be controlled. Once the decision to treat has been made, that’s where things get very different. In watermelons, we have a variety of pesticide choices. See page 115 of the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide (ID56) for the[Read More…]


(Photo by John Obermeyer.)

​I have seen more green stink bugs this year than at any time in my career. I have no logical explanation for their abundance. It was thought that as the invasive brown marmorated stink bug became established, it might outcompete the native stink bugs such as the green stink bug, causing numbers to decrease. However, this year, brown marmorated stink bugs have been relatively uncommon, and green stink bugs seem to be everywhere. Stink bugs feed with their sucking mouthparts and are likely to feed on a wide variety of vegetable crops, including cabbage, sweet corn, cucumber, bean of all types, okra, mustard, peas, peppers, and tomato. Check the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide (ID-56) for your particular crop for insecticide recommendations.


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