72 articles tagged "Tomato".

QR code linking to registration for August 13 event.

​Pinney Purdue Vegetable Field Day and Sweet Corn Sampler. Thursday, August 13, 2015. 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. CDT. Pinney Purdue Ag Center, 11402 S. County Line Rd., Wanatah, IN. Plot tours include soil health management and disease suppressive soils, tomatoes and peppers in high tunnels, and sweet corn varieties. Private Applicator Recertification (PARP) Credit available. To register, visit http://tinyurl.com/no6tosr or contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu, or 765-494-1296. Beginning Farmer Tours. Free farm tours and networking events sponsored by Purdue Extension and Local Growers Guild. For more information and to register contact the Purdue Extension Education Store at www.edustore.purdue.edu or 888-EXT-INFO. August 18: Redbud Farm, home of Caprini Creamery, Spiceland, IN. Breakfast, networking, lunch and tour. September 8: Growing Places Indy, Indianapolis, IN. Lunch, networking session, tour. Urban produce farm with raised beds, u-pick, and greenhouses. September 14: Morning Harvest, Palmyra and Hardinsburg, IN. Breakfast, networking session, lunch and tour. Developing[Read More…]


​We are again seeing a lull in pheromone trap catches of corn earworms. However, I caution sweet corn growers to remain vigilant in checking their traps. Populations can increase rapidly, especially if carried north on storm fronts from the Gulf Coast. It is also important to watch the development of the field corn around your sweet corn fields. If the field corn is not yet silking, use a threshold of 1 earworm moth per night to determine if you need to spray when your sweet corn is silking. If the neighboring field corn starts to silk, it will draw a lot of earworm moths away from your sweet corn and the treatment threshold goes up to 10 moths per night. Particularly during this lull in moth flights, this is an opportunity to save money and time by avoiding spraying silking sweet corn.


​Yellowstriped armyworms continue to cause problems for tomato growers, especially in high tunnels. The populations are often spotty within a field or high tunnel, but can easily reach damaging levels. Most of the insecticides listed in the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for control of caterpillars on fruiting vegetables (pages 135-6) will control yellowstriped armyworms. If spraying within a high tunnel, be sure that the label allows use in a greenhouse or high tunnel. Consult Table 16 on page 40 for available options.


Sweet corn ready for sampling.

​Pinney Purdue Vegetable Field Day and Sweet Corn Sampler. Thursday, August 13, 2015. 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. CDT. Pinney Purdue Ag Center, 11402 S. County Line Rd., Wanatah, IN. Plot tours include soil health management and disease suppressive soils, tomatoes and peppers in high tunnels, and sweet corn varieties. To register, contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu, or 765-494-1296.


(Photo by Dan Egel)

​Bacterial spot of tomato causes lesions on foliage and fruit of tomato. On leaves, the lesions begin as small water soaked areas and turn into brown lesions with a yellow halo. Lesions on stems often lack a yellow halo. Fruit lesions, which are responsible for direct loss of marketable yield, are often scabby in appearance (Figure 1).  Bacterial spot of tomato is favored by warm, wet weather. The causal bacterium survives on crop debris and may be seed borne. Volunteer tomatoes and peppers may also carry the disease. Transplant greenhouses should be cleaned and sanitized after each generation of transplants is produced. Management of bacterial spot of tomato has been covered in more detail here https://ag.purdue.edu/arp/swpap/VeggieDiseasesBlog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=31. The Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial Growers 2015, also has recommendations.  In this article, however, I would like to discuss a new product that has recently been labeled for this disease. Quintec® has been labeled for[Read More…]


Pith necrosis of tomato may result in dark

​This disease has been reported in two different greenhouse situations. Although the disease is not usually economically important, a brief review of the disease is offered here to help tomato growers differentiate pith necrosis from more important problems. Tomato pith necrosis causes dark brown streaks on tomato stems and leaf petioles (Figure 1).  Often stems may appear twisted and distorted. When cut open, the stem may appear discolored and chambered (Figure 2). Eventually, the affected plant may become stunted and wilt. Tomato pith necrosis is usually found in greenhouses or high tunnels. Because the plant has a discoloration in the stem, it is sometimes confused with bacterial canker, a much more serious disease. A comparison of the two diseases can be found at https://ag.purdue.edu/arp/swpap/Documents/pith-necrosis%20.pdf.  It is not clear how pith necrosis spreads or enters the tomato plant, but it is probably best to remove affected plants and avoid using pruning equipment on diseased plants. When removing[Read More…]


After a brief lull in pheromone trap catches, we have resumed catching earworm moths all around the state. Although most of the counts are relatively low (less than 10 per night), remember that for early planted sweet corn that silks before the neighboring field corn silks, the threshold for treatment is 1 moth per night. So, if you have sweet corn that is in the vulnerable stage, green silks present, treatment is justified if you are catching any earworm moths in your trap.


​Blossom end rot of tomato has been showing up in some protected growing structures. This article reviews the disorder and summarizes preventive practices. Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder caused by a deficient supply of calcium to the developing fruit. It is a common problem on tomatoes, but can also occur on peppers, eggplants, and melons. Blossom end rot appears first as a small darkened or water soaked area, usually at the blossom end of the fruit. This spot darkens, enlarges and dries out as fruit matures. The area may be invaded by secondary decay causing organisms. Prevention is the best way to avoid losses from blossom end rot. Prevention strategies emphasize ensuring adequate supply and availability of calcium, and managing plant growth environmental conditions to promote movement of calcium to the developing fruit. If I could offer just one suggestion it would be to maintain a consistent water[Read More…]


​2015 marks the 40th year of my career as an entomologist and I still am surprised on a regular basis by how insects behave. I put out a corn earworm pheromone trap on May 14 and immediately caught 7 moths that night. Over the next three nights, I caught 36 moths. Typically, the few earworms that we would expect to overwinter here in west central Indiana would emerge about June 20. It has not been an unusually warm spring, to say the least, so it is unlikely that those moths emerged locally. The other possibility is migration from southern areas. Earworm moths often migrate in on storm fronts from the south. However, when moths are blown hundreds of miles on storm fronts, their wings usually get a little tattered. The moths I’ve been catching look pristine, as if they just emerged. So, the bottom line is that I have no[Read More…]


The tomato plants shown here are stunted

​Symptoms of this disease include tomato plants with lower leaves that become yellow (chlorotic) and die; plants that begin to wilt; a lesion on the lower stem at ground level (Figures 1 and 2). If tomato plants are removed from the soil and carefully split open from the ground level, a discoloration of the vascular tissue can be observed (Figure 3). It is important to note that this discoloration does not extend up the stem more than 6 to 8 inches. If the discoloration extends up into the plant canopy, the disease may be Fusarium wilt of tomato. Although growers may observe multiple plants begin to die of this disease over a period of days or even weeks, the fungus does not splash from plant to plant.  Therefore, there should be no plant-to-plant spread in the high tunnel. Temperatures from 68 to 72°F favor Fusarium crown rot and may explain why I observed this disease last week when[Read More…]


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