29 articles tagged "Protected Culture and Season Extension".

Sweet corn ready for sampling.

​Pinney Purdue Vegetable Field Day and Sweet Corn Sampler. Thursday, August 13, 2015. 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. CDT. Pinney Purdue Ag Center, 11402 S. County Line Rd., Wanatah, IN. Plot tours include soil health management and disease suppressive soils, tomatoes and peppers in high tunnels, and sweet corn varieties. To register, contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu, or 765-494-1296.


​​A field day will be held on July 9 to share with the public the various research activities at the Southwest Purdue Agricultural Center in Vincennes, IN. The day will start at 7:30 A.M. with a health fair. Registration starts at 8:30 A.M. Presentation topics include: managing cucumber beetles while protecting bees, production of vegetables in high tunnels, canola production, hybrid cottonwood as a bioenergy crop, grape production, field crops disease update, soybean production, maximizing seed corn investment and benefits of starter fertilizer. Lunch is free with registration. A PARP class will be offered after lunch. Please contact Barb Joyner at 812-886-0198 or joynerb@purdue.edu to RSVP or go on-line at http:///tinyurl.com/2015SWPAC.


​Blossom end rot of tomato has been showing up in some protected growing structures. This article reviews the disorder and summarizes preventive practices. Blossom end rot is a physiological disorder caused by a deficient supply of calcium to the developing fruit. It is a common problem on tomatoes, but can also occur on peppers, eggplants, and melons. Blossom end rot appears first as a small darkened or water soaked area, usually at the blossom end of the fruit. This spot darkens, enlarges and dries out as fruit matures. The area may be invaded by secondary decay causing organisms. Prevention is the best way to avoid losses from blossom end rot. Prevention strategies emphasize ensuring adequate supply and availability of calcium, and managing plant growth environmental conditions to promote movement of calcium to the developing fruit. If I could offer just one suggestion it would be to maintain a consistent water[Read More…]


​In March 2015 the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture appointed Dr. Petrus Langenhoven as Horticulture and Hydroponics Crop Specialist. During the past 18 years Dr. Petrus Langenhoven has dedicated his career to the development of the horticulture sector in Sub-Saharan Africa. His career started off at the Agricultural Research Council in Stellenbosch, South Africa. He completed his M.S in Agronomy at Stellenbosch University while working at the Agricultural Research Council. He completed his PhD in Agronomy specializing in vegetable production in high tunnels at Stellenbosch University, South Africa in 2004. He advanced his career at a non-governmental organization, Agribusiness in Sustainable Natural African Plant Products (ASNAPP). As operations director and senior agronomist he led ASNAPP’s greenhouse crop production and specialty fresh market vegetable and herb crop research and technology transfer programs. He specialized in the analysis and development of horticulture supply chains. He has extensive experience in applied on-farm[Read More…]


​A field day will be held on July 9 to share with the public the various research activities at the Southwest Purdue Agricultural Center in Vincennes, IN. The day will start at 7:30 A.M. with a health fair. Registration starts at 8:30 A.M. Presentation topics include: managing cucumber beetles while protecting bees, production of vegetables in high tunnels, canola production, hybrid cottonwood as a bioenergy crop, grape production, field crops disease update, soybean production, maximizing seed corn investment and benefits of starter fertilizer. Lunch is free with registration. A PARP class will be offered after lunch. Please contact Barb Joyner at 812-886-0198 or joynerb@purdue.edu to RSVP or go on-line at http:///tinyurl.com/2015SWPAC.


​Samples in plug trays, as well as unrooted and rooted cuttings, and plants in pots require extra care when they are packaged for submittal to a diagnostic lab. Before you mail the next sample, please take a few minutes to review these suggestions for packaging and submitting samples. This will help preserve the integrity of the sample during shipment and increase the likelihood of a more accurate diagnosis. Plugs – keep them in the tray. If possible, do not remove the plugs from the plug tray. Submitting either an entire tray or cutting off a section of the tray helps maintain the integrity of the plants (Figure 1). Secondary decay often occurs when soil is allowed to come in contact with the foliage, interfering with accurate diagnosis. When possible, submit at least 5-10 cells with plugs. This provides the diagnostician with ample material for microscopic observation, culturing, and virus testing[Read More…]


The tomato plants shown here are stunted

​Symptoms of this disease include tomato plants with lower leaves that become yellow (chlorotic) and die; plants that begin to wilt; a lesion on the lower stem at ground level (Figures 1 and 2). If tomato plants are removed from the soil and carefully split open from the ground level, a discoloration of the vascular tissue can be observed (Figure 3). It is important to note that this discoloration does not extend up the stem more than 6 to 8 inches. If the discoloration extends up into the plant canopy, the disease may be Fusarium wilt of tomato. Although growers may observe multiple plants begin to die of this disease over a period of days or even weeks, the fungus does not splash from plant to plant.  Therefore, there should be no plant-to-plant spread in the high tunnel. Temperatures from 68 to 72°F favor Fusarium crown rot and may explain why I observed this disease last week when[Read More…]


The tomato seedlings above exhibit downward curled leaves (red arrows) which maybe a symptom of ethylene damage and yellow seed leaves with lesions (red circles)

​This is the time of year when growers often call to complain about tomato transplants that do not look right.  One possibility is that the seedlings suffer from heater problems.  In particular, tomato plants are very susceptible to damage from the gas ethylene.  In Figure 1, some of the seedlings have leaves that are curled down and stems that are twisted (epinasty in botanical terms). Epinasty is a common symptom of ethylene damage. Ethylene is a common by-product of incomplete combustion of several different types of fuel.  Incomplete combustion is often the result of heaters that are not working efficiently. Tomatoes are very sensitive to ethylene damage. A second clue is to take a closer look at the yellow seed leaves (Figure 1). Ethylene damage does not include yellowing. Furthermore, there is a spotting on the lower leaves that is not typical ethylene damage. I believe that the symptoms on seed leaves were as a result of a different compound,[Read More…]


White mold

In early March, I observed white mold of recently transplanted tomato plants in a greenhouse situation. I have described the symptoms, biology and management of white mold at https://ag.purdue.edu/arp/swpap/VeggieDiseasesBlog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=18 . I have never observed white mold (a.k.a, timber rot) in February before. I have observed white mold of tomato transplants in April. However, the very small mushroom (smaller than a dime) that is part of the life cycle usually emerges in the spring after a cold period. The appearance of white mold in February may be as a result of the presence of the mushroom in the greenhouse that produced the transplants. To reduce severity of white mold of tomato, I recommend that tomato growers: Inspect transplants for stem lesions which may be a symptom of white mold. Bring questionable symptoms to my attention or send them to the Purdue Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory (http://www.ppdl.purdue.edu/ppdl/index.html). Clean and sanitize greenhouses[Read More…]


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